Period 1 – Criminal Behavior Lesson Plans (5-15-2015)

Criminal Behavior HeaderNote from Mr. Tyler –

I guarantee I will be back on this coming Monday. I expect each of you ready to present your projects. You will have four minutes to speak and about one minute to answer any questions from myself or your peers. If you decided to write an essay for the project you may feel free to e-mail it to me. I will send you an acknowledgement once I receive it.

ACTIVITY DIRECTIONS

Today you will again weigh in on several key issues in the U.S. legal system. For each issue follow the steps below.
Step 1 – Develop 10 pros and 10 cons for the issue.
Step 2 – Take a stance on the issue. No straddling the fence. Pick a side.
Step 3 – Write an academic paragraph with evidence defending your position.

KEY ISSUE #1 – DRINKING AGE

All 50 US states have set their minimum drinking age to 21 although exceptions do exist on a state-by-state basis for consumption at home, under adult supervision, for medical necessity, and other reasons.
Proponents of lowering the minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) from 21 argue that it has not stopped teen drinking, and has instead pushed underage binge drinking into private and less controlled environments, leading to more health and life-endangering behavior by teens.
Opponents of lowering the MLDA argue that teens have not yet reached an age where they can handle alcohol responsibly, and thus are more likely to harm or even kill themselves and others by drinking prior to 21. They contend that traffic fatalities decreased when the MLDA increased.

KEY ISSUE #2 – CONCEALED HANDGUNS

Carrying a concealed handgun in public is permitted in all 50 states as of 2013, when Illinois became the last state to enact concealed carry legislation. Some states require gun owners to obtain permits while others have “unrestricted carry” and do not require permits.
Proponents of concealed carry say that criminals are less likely to attack someone they believe to be armed. They cite the 2nd Amendment’s “right of the people to keep and bear arms,” and argue that most adults who legally carry a concealed gun are law-abiding and do not misuse their firearms.
Opponents of concealed carry argue that increased gun ownership leads to more gun crime and unintended gun injuries. They contend that concealed handguns increase the chances of arguments becoming lethal, and that society would be safer with fewer guns on the street, not more.

KEY ISSUE #3 – SOCIAL MEDIA

74% of American adults online use social networking sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest, as of Jan. 2014, up from 26% in 2008. On social media sites like these, users may develop biographical profiles, communicate with friends and strangers, do research, and share thoughts, photos, music, links, and more.

Proponents of social networking sites say that the online communities promote increased interaction with friends and family; offer teachers, librarians, and students valuable access to educational support and materials; facilitate social and political change; and disseminate useful information rapidly.

Opponents of social networking say that the sites prevent face-to-face communication; waste time on frivolous activity; alter children’s brains and behavior making them more prone to ADHD; expose users to predators like pedophiles and burglars; and spread false and potentially dangerous information.

KEY ISSUE #4 – EUTHANASIA

Proponents of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) contend that terminally ill people should have the right to end their suffering with a quick, dignified, and compassionate death. They argue that the right to die is protected by the same constitutional safeguards that guarantee such rights as marriage, procreation, and the refusal or termination of life-saving medical treatment.

Opponents of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide contend that doctors have a moral responsibility to keep their patients alive as reflected by the Hippocratic Oath. They argue there may be a “slippery slope” from euthanasia to murder, and that legalizing euthanasia will unfairly target the poor and disabled and create incentives for insurance companies to terminate lives in order to save money.

HOMEWORK:

Juvenile Justice Summative Project. Due – May 18th, 2015

Downloadable PDF Directions -> Summative Projects for Juvenile Justice